Cloaking Boron Carbide – Invisible army armor

Recently, while researching through an oxygen bomb structure that could transform the life on Mars, I also discovered an interesting pattern in developing an Invisible army armor. This invisible army Armour is special because it can deflect light particles which makes it invisible.

Because the structure of the invisible army Armour is made from Boron and Carbon it can be used in combat as a heavy duty shield.

Now the structure Boron is a perfect bond for the electrons to create bonds with the carbon electrons which use only 1/3 of their energy to encapsulate the links. The 2/3 of the energy is stored in the electrons which makes them to absorb to the light particles. This way the link between boron and carbon is strong, but it creates the diamond light pass effect.

As you can see in the picture bellow, the structure of the material follows a pattern that it is similar with the diamond one shape.

invisible-army-armour

 

Now, the diamond shape has been designed in such a way that it absorbs light only from one side. As for the other side, the structure does not reflect entirely. The material is solid, as any other body armor.

What are the benefits of an Invisible army armor?

With this structure we can make objects to cloak based on their position with the observer. As an example, when this is applied to a tank, the object becomes fully invisible on a perpendicular trajectory with the object. The object can be invisible up to a degree of 120, from where it becomes fully solid.

So how this works? Basically, the object can transform the light trajectory through a system of angled connections which makes the light to be bounced on surface. The electrons of the connections which make the surface, they absorb light, thus the surface is completely invisible. The light in a diamond structure is absorbed by its electrons. Here the light is bounced from surface to surface until the exit point and it is being absorbed by the electrons.

Boron Carbide - Invisible armorNow, from a soldier perspective this will give the benefit of an army to become fully hidden into enemy territory. More or less, it advances any position on ground, air and space.

Invisible armour. Know the hide from inside.

If you’d be interested in buying the technology, please do not hesitate to contact Andrei Toma for more details.

AIS – Advanced interconnected strings

ADVANCED INTERCONNECTED STRINGS

ADVANCED INTERCONNECTED STRINGS

 Advanced interconnected strings

This research project had interrogated the states of connectivity through space and the formation of space through sets of patterns which repeat like in a DNA structure. The analysis consisted of developing formations and groups of materials such as columns that can support each other in an assembly. The result came after experimenting with different sets of algorithms, but the most important function was the angle of these connections.

We’ve discovered that a set of 14 strings, connected to each other create spatial formations that can be multiplied in every dimension to the extent of infinite. The results are amazing.

We’ve created social formations for homes and cities and cities within cities that can work vertically and horizontally without the need for extra structural support, or to the extent where the structural support can be maintained at minimum.

The algorithm it is manufactured to accommodate any shape. We’ve experienced with the formation of a human body we achieved it.

The spaces which are created inside the formations are useful for developing external factors like power cords and other structural support.

advanced-interconnected-strings
AIS – DNA – side view

The strings are useful for property development and robotics.

We’ve researched a flat pack model of a house that worked perfectly in 4 module formation, but due to computation limitation, we cannot render the human body or a bigger assembly of the AIS.

Further research is needed and we are welcoming private funding. We are based in the City of London , 1st Floor, 1 E Poultry Ave, London EC1A 9PT.

For further information please call 0203 475 8995 and ask for Andrei Toma.

BlobHouse – The greenest in house developments

The Modulare Green House

The BlobHouse is a green house prototype which is being developed since 2009 as part of the ICDS Arch research programme. This house it is unique in its way of being a green house as it is designed to match the current economic climate which the world has.

We’ve done research in world wide trends in terms of jobs and economic sustainability and we came to the conclusion that the world needs a change tot the residential market, as there it is not a solid design to sustain and incorporate a green agenda to the meet a Kyoto protocol in world of green development. Our research show an increase in singular entrepreneurial person which are running their own business from home. Other increase is in people working for companies from home. In order to provide a healthy and comfortable environment for these people, the BlobHouse has developed its unique strategy in matching requirements aimed at universal usage for those who work, or own a business environment from home.

BlobHouse – Green Lounge and Kitchen

The access to the house is made via the enclosed garden which leads to the lounge and the kitchen of the house. A stair leads to the work module which is facing the south of the house to keep the office cool, while the office is also providing heath which is conserved and used to warm up the house.

From the lounge you also have access to the bedrooms above . Also above you will find the toilets which act as duo for office and residential use.

The house has been developed to meet plasticity of intersecting transparency in the whole house, where everything looks private from outside and public inside, where everything is familiar and open.

Live Module Intersecting work and green

By incorporating these modules together was with the aim to bring down the cost you spend on your services, but also to give that sense of  living the green. Also we wanted to keep the private part of the office routine and not interfere with the lounge, where in most cases of house developments it was a problem.

The Work module sits above all modules and provides views from wide screen covering the module. At the bottom of the module you will find the reception area where the secretary and archives sit. At the top you will find an open plan space to accommodate up to five people.

BlobHouse Façade

If you ever ask yourself how this façade will be possible to manufacture from glass, you will find that we’re using only only green materials from which can be recycled. The façade will be made from thermoplastic which gives us the opportunity to make the globe to look like this. This is a prototype and some divisions are made to incorporate and maintain a portability of the house as well.

We will post any new developments which we will find suitable for the open public.

Opportunities for architects and urban designers

Opportunities of Architect and Urban Designer

Introduction

 

The opportunities which new mapping technologies afford the architect and the urban designer throughout architectural practices offers the capabilities in decomposing the existing architectural image to integrate the human interaction. Offering to the architect the possibility articulate the mechanics of living, adapting to the technological environment while conceptualizing and transferring the  the image of the nature to become the tool in organizing compositions and spaces in interior, exterior and urban design for further generations.

The technological environment has provided to the architect the tools in developing the architectural image by extending the image of architecture through various media and wired capabilities.

The new enhanced material capabilities afford the architect to better structure the realm of possibilities, providing more interaction between nature and the built form, a jungle matrix through the architectural image provided by the theories of Peter Eisenman, Antonio Saggio and Derick de Kerchove, which will provide the analysis for the materials with memory capacity.

Man has built spaces, interpreted after the natural form, transferring the graphical reproduction of the natural form into architectural form as described by the theories of David Gissen and the conceptual thought of John Tierney and Dan O’Sullivan.

Human interaction is essential for architect in developing spaces, such as the new mapping technologies would inter-connect the mechanical and the computational generating new sets of forms and surfaces articulated throughout dwellings and urban environments; structural thought provided by Patrick Schumacher and Brett Steele from Architectural Association London and related  dwelling case studies of Le Corbusier.

Another urban development is analysed by the University of Tokyo, and on which senses of the places become the realm of structural and functional understanding to bridge the tools for the architect to cultivate architecture’s other environments into integrated places, mapping and integrating the architecture’s environments into the whole building continuum.

 

 

Man and the technological environment

 

“We cultivate and theorize our technological environment today in strange and partial ways, without ever admitting to ourselves that this is what it is, an environment. ”  (Kwinter, Sanford 2007:18)

 Architecture is the product of our imagination, as Leon van Schaik (2008) has mentioned, ‘architecture is a product of mental space’, which brings together the world, to generate the connections in developing extensive environments, in which we live and share as a community as Furion Barzon (2003) has mentioned.

The mental space is the place where man engages into the journey through space. Dan O’Sullivan (1994) has mentioned, man would engage into its journey to constantly looking for points and signage to interact with, engaging in connected relations between nature and the built environment, engaging into matrix of possibilities as Peter Eisenman (2003) points out.

The journey offers the representation of the projected consciousness, in other terms the built reality, which is in fact a product of repetitive information packets interacting through the built environment into one physical environment as Derrick de Kerchove (2001) points out.

            “The architecture of intelligence is the architecture of connectivity. It is the architecture that brings together the three main spatial environments that we live in and with today : mind, world and networks. “ (Derrick de Kerchove 2001:7)

The architectural image developed by interacting connections within our mental space becomes the product in sensing the spatial environments, to become the main interaction into extending the boundary of the architectural image, as Peter Eisenman (2003) has mentioned.

The projected image becomes the main spatial environment in which we live, and which is transferring the mind, the world and the network into becoming the system of connection, as Derrick de Kerchove (2001) has mentioned.

The architecture of intelligence which engages into being the information package embedded with artificial networks, interpreted as infrastructure between physical and the virtual, as Peter Eisenman (2003) points out.

            “Connected architecture tackles the management of thresholds and infrastructures between first the physical and the virtual space, but ultimately also the thresholds  between mental and virtual spaces even as more and more designers are called upon to interpret new cognitives possibilities.” (Kerchove, de Derick 2001:18)

The projected image of architecture becomes the image of the intelligent architecture. It is consisting of information clusters which is connecting multiple instances of time between different thresholds, between mental and virtual as Derrick de Kerchove (2001) points out, between solid and fluid.

Mapping Options

FIG.1 Intelligent environment characteristics (Addington and Shcodek 2005)

 

The parameters of reasoning and evaluation as defined in Fig.1 reflect within our mental space producing the visual structure which is managing our view and our perception of the built environment through the surrounding space. The interaction between space and the perception of the build environment, is developing the sensorial synthesis, as Paul Adam (2007) has mentioned,  ‘the sensorial synthesis is  based and formed from patterns interacting impressions, sensations and ideas’.

The sensorial synthesis is the organizational mechanism which is developed not only to give us the sense of space, but also to place us inside, and outside the inhabited space, and in the atmosphere within our physical environment, as shown in Fig.1. It constitutes models for implemented awareness through the organizational mechanism.

            “The image of the building boundary as the demarcation between two different environments defined as single states – a homogeneous interior and an ambient exterior – could possibly be replaced by the idea of multiple energy environments  fluidly interacting with the moving body.” (Addington and Shcodek 2005:8)

The building boundary of the built environment as Addington and Shcodek (2005) points out is the demarcation between different homogeneous and ambient states of intersecting bodies through space. The interaction generated by the moving body through this particular environment would create multiple energy points, defined as environments which would fluidly interact with the organizational components of the system.

Mapping human and urban 2

Man and the natural environment

             “In ecosystems, species’ cooperation and competition are interlinked and held in balance so that the system permits independent activity on the part of each individual of a species, yet cooperatively meshes the activity patterns of all species.”                                                                       (Yang, Ken 2006:51)

As Ken Yang (2008) has mentioned, species of the ecosystem are interlinked by their individual patterns. The individual patterns are linking the community of organisms in their physical environment, in this case, the ecosystem.

The differences between communities define the activity patterns of each individual where interactions take place. The mesh is the representation of the projected image of the ecosystem.

Eco – Grid

FIG.2 – Smart grid Ecosystem  Carbon Pross (2009)

 

The projected image of the ecosystem is exploration the visual memory as David Gissen (2009) has mentioned, is the projected image of the projected environment in which individual is situated.  The individual, as David Gissen (2009) has mentioned, is processing the nature of architecture from caves; ‘the subnature in the dark, wet and cool spaces that mark the origins of architecture’ (Gissen, David, 2009:30).

The architectural image which these spaced had to offer has placed the individual receptors of the architectural partitions in ‘elegant composition’ as Patrick Schumacher (2007) points out.

            ‘Just like natural systems, elegant compositions are so highly integrated that they cannot be easily decomposed into independent subsystems – a major point of  difference in comparison with the modern design paradigm of clear separation of  functional subsystems. In fact the exploitation of natural forms like landscape  formations or organic morphologies as a source domain for analogical transference  into architecture makes a constructive contribution to the development of this new paradigm and language of architecture.’  (Patrick Schumacher, 2007)

As Patrick Schumacher (2007) points here, he places the elegant compositions into another realm of integration, which in terms of their complexity, would be harder to be decomposed into individual subsystems.

If the decomposition is finding its interactions, this could create and drive the individual through realisation of functional subsystems.

The decomposition of natural systems should be made progressively through the partitions of elegant composition in order to understand their structure which would create the ‘new paradigm and language of architecture’ (Patrick Scumacker, 2007).

Architectural space has been modulated through inertia between physical production and philosophical context as Derrick de Kerchove (2001) points out, which had the bases in exploitation and understanding of the natural forms as David Gissen (2009) points out.

The ‘elegant compositions’ (Patrick Scumacher, 2007) are the product of exploiting the physical and philosophical context of the natural form. Exploitations in which architecture has been with natural environment and technology as the ‘practical application of scientific discoveries’ (Philip’s, 2008), has been able to provide the physical endurance to join all the developing organisms into one system, forwarding the joined communities towards new mutations, a joined understanding, always at the barrier between old generated systems and new implemented behaviours developed in connections, articulations, links.

            “On top of the power grid, the wiring of the planet’s information system was accomplished with three integrated but technically superposed ‘webs’, the telegraph cables, the telephone switchboard and the world wide web.”                                                                                     (De Kerchove, Derrick 2001:26)

Just as natural systems architecture is interlinked and held in balance between ‘elegant composition’ (Patrick Scumacher, 2007) and integrated independent components which make architecture to fully integrate into environment.

Man creatively adapts to the constructive contribution as Peter Eisenman (2003) points out,  making the connection of the architecture to transfer the information of organic morphologies into development of built subsystems, separated by exploitation of social context in which the system differentiates.

            “A new continuity, or electromagnetic webness between subjects that are all spatially distant and qualitatively different such as bodies things and the overall whole, the  new constructed environment that surrounds us.” (de Kerchove, Derrick, 2001:88)

The integration of the subsystems in development of architecture would engage with the built environment through digital integration. The complexity is balanced between systems, and thinking the natural environment as a natural system, the power to empower equilibrium as Kim Dovey (1999) points out, should create the needed interaction to generate ‘transcultural systems’ (de Kerchove, Derrick, 2001:88), within the digital and the natural systems.

The new created system and distinction between technological environments and the natural environment would create a seamless extensive high-density landscape incorporating both sides, as Ken Yang (2006) mentioned, the environment and the dwell should be regarded as a dynamic continuum acting together as a whole.